Ki-we can change the world together.

We lose an area of forest the size of a football pitch every two seconds, which means less space for animals to thrive. It’s predicted there will be more plastic than fish in the sea by 2050. If we fail to act on climate change, 1 in 6 species could go extinct.

Together we can turn things around.

As New Zealanders we’re inspired by nature, so we want to look after it. We’ve worked hard to become 100% recyclable and are helping save our national icon, the kiwi, from extinction (you might know him better as the quirky little bird on our logo). Working with the charity Kiwis for kiwi, we’ve helped improve the status of the kiwi from ‘endangered’ to ‘vulnerable’, but we still have a long way to go. Together we’re determined to see the kiwi population flourish, once again, across New Zealand.

Habitat loss doesn’t just affect the kiwi, it’s one of the biggest threats to animals around the world. That’s why we’ve partnered with WWF to protect natural habitats. Together we’re ensuring species are protected from extinction and that nature is restored.

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Where are we protecting?

From the sunny savannahs of East Africa to the rapid river basins of China, we’re working together with WWF to help protect some of the most biodiverse habitats around the world. That includes a WWF project that’s protecting a whopping 500,000 acres in the Amazon Rainforest. Not only is the Amazon home to 10% of all the species on Earth, the trees there also help clean the atmosphere by storing an impressive 140 billion tons of carbon emissions. Basically, no Amazonian trees = no fresh breeze!

The world’s quirky creatures need our help!

From the lush landscapes of New Zealand to the exotic Amazon rainforest, the world is full of weird and wonderful creatures that often get overlooked. But just like the more popular endangered animals, habitat loss is one of the biggest threats to their existence.

Kiwi - New Zealand

Kiwi - New Zealand

This quirky little bird is like no other!

Kiwi - New Zealand

Kiwi - New Zealand

This quirky little bird is like no other; they’re flightless, have feathers like fur and even have nostrils at the end of their beak. Instead of nesting in trees, they dig underground burrows and lay gigantic eggs. The kiwi became nocturnal to hide from predators introduced by man. Their population has decreased by 99% in the last 50 years. But, together with Kiwis for kiwi, we’re turning their fortunes around.

Yangtze Finless Porpoise, China

Yangtze Finless Porpoise, China

Lovingly called "river pig" by locals

Yangtze Finless Porpoise, China

Yangtze Finless Porpoise, China

Lovingly called "river pig" by locals, the porpoise’s naturally cheeky smile has made it quite an icon in China. But food loss and boat collisions are making the river a dangerous place – driving the Yangtze River Dolphin to extinction in 2006, now the finless porpoise is at risk of facing the same fate.

Gharial, India

Gharial, India

Despite their huge size, this cousin of the crocodile is far from a man-eater.

Gharial, India

Gharial, India

Despite their huge size, this cousin of the crocodile is far from a man-eater. Male Gharials use their snout to make sounds and blow bubbles to attract a mate. Incredibly endangered, they often get caught in fisherman’s nets and their homes, in rivers like the Ganges, are being polluted by toxic waste.

Jaguar, Amazon

Jaguar, Amazon

They’re the largest cats in Latin America and the top predator in the Amazon.

Jaguar, Amazon

Jaguar, Amazon

They’re the largest cats in Latin America and the top predator in the Amazon. Unlike most cats, jaguars love water and will even hunt whilst swimming. Tragically, their habitat has already decreased by 50%, and they’re still killed because people fear them or because they prey on livestock.

Giant Anteater, Amazon

Giant Anteater, Amazon

Surprisingly these greedy eaters don’t have teeth.

Giant Anteater, Amazon

Giant Anteater, Amazon

Surprisingly these greedy eaters don’t have teeth. Instead they guzzle around 30,000 ants and termites a day with their long tongues. Scientists estimate there may be as little as 5,000 of them left in the wild. They really need protecting.

Short Ear Dog, Amazon

Short Ear Dog, Amazon

These dogs are pretty cheeky and rely on another quirky creature for their burrows.

Short Ear Dog, Amazon

Short Ear Dog, Amazon

These dogs are pretty cheeky and rely on another quirky creature for their burrows. They take shelter in a hole once an armadillo has done the hard work of digging it! Their fruity diet means they also play a vital role in the Amazonian ecosystem, which is why it’s essential we protect them.